Friday, April 18, 2014
nickdrake:

West side Story.

nickdrake:

West side Story.

nychealth:

Noise in NYC
Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.
Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.
To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:
4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 
3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.
 
NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:
111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

nychealth:

Noise in NYC

Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.

Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.

To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:

  • 4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months.
  • 3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
  • More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.

 

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:

  • 111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
  • More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
  • 1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
  • 311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
  • Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

rogerwilkerson:

Happy Friday!

rogerwilkerson:

Happy Friday!

unhistorical:

Gabriel García Márquez Dead: Nobel Prize-Winning Author Dies At 87 (TIMENew York Times)

Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez was the author of One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), Autumn of the Patriarch (1975), Love in the Time of Cholera (1985), in addition to many other novels, short stories, and non-fiction works. In 1982 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature for “his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent’s life and conflicts.” García Márquez, only the fourth of six Latin Americans to be awarded the literature prize since its inception in 1901, lamented: “they have taken into account the literature of the sub-continent and have awarded me as a way of awarding all of this literature.” In his acceptance speech, entitled “The Solitude of Latin America”, García Márquez addressed the postcolonial struggles of Latin American nations, and the willing embrace by European institutions of Latin American cultural expression but not its social realities:

Latin America neither wants, nor has any reason, to be a pawn without a will of its own; nor is it merely wishful thinking that its quest for independence and originality should become a Western aspiration. However, the navigational advances that have narrowed such distances between our Americas and Europe seem, conversely, to have accentuated our cultural remoteness. Why is the originality so readily granted us in literature so mistrustfully denied us in our difficult attempts at social change? Why think that the social justice sought by progressive Europeans for their own countries cannot also be a goal for Latin America, with different methods for dissimilar conditions? 

fuckindiva:

Peter O’Toole and Audrey Hepburn on the set of How to Steal a Million, 1966

fuckindiva:

Peter O’Toole and Audrey Hepburn on the set of How to Steal a Million, 1966

marilynmonroesite:

Marilyn Monroe 1950

They were like Romeo and Juliet. They fought like hell, but they were meant to be together”. -John Densmore

Jim Morrison & Pam Morrison, photographed by Edmund Teske, 1969. 
gameraboy:

Pioneer Days (1930)

gameraboy:

Pioneer Days (1930)

Proof The US Is An Oligarchy, Not A Democracy


SUPPORT the 28th Amendment to #GetMoneyOut http://www.wolf-pac.com/petition?=tyt….

CLICK here to support Wolf PAC: http://www.wolf-pac.com/wolf_pac_memb…

*A study, to appear in the Fall 2014 issue of the academic journal Perspectives on Politics, finds that the U.S. is no democracy, but instead an oligarchy…The authors of this historically important study are Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page, and their article is titled “Testing Theories of American Politics.” The authors clarify that the data available are probably under-representing the actual extent of control of the U.S. by the super-rich…* The Young Turks host Cenk Uygur breaks it down.

*Read more here from Eric Zuesse at Common Dreams: https://www.commondreams.org/view/201…

(Source: nadioz)

The 67th Cannes Film Festival poster & Federico fellini’s 8½

Herve Chigioni and his graphic designer Gilles Frappier have based the poster design for the 67th Festival de Cannes on a photogram taken from Federico Fellini’s 8½, which was presented in the Official Selection in 1963.

"The way he looks at us above his black glasses draws us right in to a promise of global cinematographic happiness,” explains the poster’s designer. “The happiness of experiencing the Festival de Cannes together.”

(Source: alsk00)

humansofnewyork:

"If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?""Keep your word.""What’s a time that you didn’t keep your word, that you now regret?""When I was younger, I told a friend that I’d go with her to get an abortion. And I never showed up."

humansofnewyork:

"If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?"
"Keep your word."
"What’s a time that you didn’t keep your word, that you now regret?"
"When I was younger, I told a friend that I’d go with her to get an abortion. And I never showed up."

jtotheizzoe:

So if we use the logic of Philip K. Dick and Neil deGrasse Tyson, science = reality.

I’m down with that.

More on Dick’s philosophy at Brain Pickings.

krocatoo:

Having to google internet slang your friend is using because you have no idea what the fuck it means.

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